Potatoes



Per the ever so scientific method of weighing oneself holding the box and then weighing oneself without the box and noting the difference, we have just stored 15.2 pounds of potatoes in our root cellar. I think that is exciting. When I first harvested them, I was disappointed. There didn’t seem to many. But now I recall that the seed potatoes we purchased didn’t even total 1 pound. That is quite a haul. Again, our biggest problem this year was that they went dry. Apparently my ingenious method of taking chicken wire, securing it into a short barrel with zip ties and planting potatoes in soil causes too much air circulation around the roots and they dry out quite a bit. We had a very dry summer, so that didn’t help. I’m going to try another way next year. Keith has some ideas.

So far, the Chieftains did the best, with the Russets pulling in close second. The Russian Banana Fingerling were sort of growing on the side of the house and I pulled the plant up and popped it in a planter, so that was the lowest yield, as we only started from one plant.

I will definitely grow both the Chieftains and the Russets next year.

I just had to Google “Storing Potatoes for the Winter” and so have them layered between newspaper in a cardboard box and laid up against, but not quite touching, the cement wall in the cooler part of the basement where no windows are facing. Hopefully they’ll stay cool and dry there and not cause any rot.


DaisyPatch Farm

As I mentioned here, Mr. Potatohead, our patron saint of potatoes, will be modeling each variety of potatoes we grew this year. Behold, Cranberry Red potatoes.

Yes, he is sitting in cranberry sauce.

Credits:

Producer: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, DaisyPatch Farm

Co-Producer: Erica McAllister

Costuming: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, Erica McAllister

Photography: Erica McAllister, Jenn Gorius Gosselin

Lighting: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, Erica McAllister


DaisyPatch Farm.  Mr. Potatohead (our patron Saint of potatoes) has decided to model each variety of the potatoes we grew this year. Our niece, Erica (@EmikoRay on Twitter and blogging at http://ericamcllstr.blog.com/ ) helped with the production.

Behold, Russian Banana Fingerling Potatoes (we found the texture to be very creamy. Excellent for homefries!)

Credits:

Producer: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, DaisyPatch Farm

Co-Producer: Erica McAllister

Costuming: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, Erica McAllister

Photography: Erica McAllister, Jenn Gorius Gosselin

Lighting: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, Erica McAllister


I just added RSS (Really Simple Syndication) in the right hand column of my site so you can stay up to date on new posts and comments via RSS, or by email (or just by visiting the site daily because you love it so much!) Your choice. I’m unsure what took me so long. Oh, I know, I was in the garden. It was Really Simple (awful, awful attempt at a play on words. I’m ashamed of it, actually). (Yet, still did it, what does that say?) Have a great weekend.

Stay tuned, we’ll be harvesting potatoes this weekend and Mr. Potatohead is coming back for a guest appearance.


My potato haiku…ahem…

I love potatoes

Mashed, Roasted or as Salad

Ideal comfort food

On January 2, I ordered the Rare Potato Mix through Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.  They arrived 2 weeks ago and smiled at me through their pretty, colorful bags. The potatoes were from Wood Prarie Farm in Bridgewater, ME.

2.5 pounds of Cranberry Red, 2.5 pounds of Carola, 1 pound of Russian Banana Fingerling and 1 pound of Rose Finn Apple Fingerling – all ready to take their place in the DaisyPatch. Then it rained. All weekend. I know, I know, what’s a little rain? I didn’t feel like dealing with it in the rain.

So they waited. This was the weekend of the potato. A few years ago, we made “bins” of chicken wire and filled them with soil, using them as planters for the potatoes. We got potatoes and a lot of slugs who made their way through the chicken wire. Last year, we tried 5 gallon buckets with drainage holes drilled in the bottom. We got potatoes, but not very many. The containers were just too small. So, finally, I got to it this past weekend.

Step 1. Move plants and weed.

Step 2. Lay down landscape fabric.

Step 3. Bring out the chicken wire fencing and grab the wire cutters.

Step 4. Make bins. Step 5. Fill with compost.

Step 6. Plant seed potatoes. Cover with more compost. Label.

   22
22
22
2
2
2
I didn’t count the steps where I went inside to get bandaids because the chicken wire snagged my leg. Or the 4 bandaids – one for each blister on my right hand from the wire cutters.  Those are extra steps I hope to skip next year.
Now, we water, watch, “hill” by adding more compost as the greens emerge. And wait. Mmm. They came with a recipe for Buttermilk Potato Soup. Doesn’t that just sound delish?