August 2011



DaisyPatch Farm

As I mentioned here, Mr. Potatohead, our patron saint of potatoes, will be modeling each variety of potatoes we grew this year. Behold, Cranberry Red potatoes.

Yes, he is sitting in cranberry sauce.

Credits:

Producer: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, DaisyPatch Farm

Co-Producer: Erica McAllister

Costuming: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, Erica McAllister

Photography: Erica McAllister, Jenn Gorius Gosselin

Lighting: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, Erica McAllister


Someone posted Keith’s photo as their own.  Here’s the original  and here’s the stolen photo. Bastard. That’s all I can say. Gratefully, some people came to my defense, found the original photo on our site and gave us credit. 

What I find fascinating is that it caused over 1700 hits on our site in one day. And several more subscribers. Um, I am not sure if this is a good thing. I will need to wait and see. When it comes to stealing someone else’s photos off the internet, JUST SAY NO.


My spotty tomato haiku…ahem…

Spotty tomatoes

It’s kind of embarrassing

Damn f’ing fungus

Yup, that’s a decent pile of tomatoes for the first harvest. Look closely at the striped romas. They not lookin’ so hot. The lower half of each plant is just about dead. The spots have spread to the ‘maters as you can see. We’ve made the decision to not grow tomatoes next year. At all. Get rid of the fungus that is buried deep in the soil, possessing it like a demon, coming to the surface on hot, humid days. So, we’re going to jar as many of these as we can (we’ve read up, the spotty tomatoes are fine to eat, but we’re going to cook them anyway. You know, boil off the evil.)

Meanwhile, we’ll deal with the counter (and windowsill and sink…) full of spotty ‘maters. Evil, possessed, spotty ‘maters. Damn it.



DaisyPatch Farm.  Mr. Potatohead (our patron Saint of potatoes) has decided to model each variety of the potatoes we grew this year. Our niece, Erica (@EmikoRay on Twitter and blogging at http://ericamcllstr.blog.com/ ) helped with the production.

Behold, Russian Banana Fingerling Potatoes (we found the texture to be very creamy. Excellent for homefries!)

Credits:

Producer: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, DaisyPatch Farm

Co-Producer: Erica McAllister

Costuming: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, Erica McAllister

Photography: Erica McAllister, Jenn Gorius Gosselin

Lighting: Jenn Gorius Gosselin, Erica McAllister


I just made bruschetta and want to share the recipe. Before we go there, however, we need a lesson on how to pronounce, “bruschetta.” I used to say “BROO-shett-uh.”  That is incorrect. After ordering a delish rendition of bruschetta at Dolce Vita in Boston’s North End, I have learned to say it correctly. (If you get the chance to go there, GO! Franco rocks, and sings to the crowd. Much fun to be had by all!) 

Ready? Here we go…”Br(roll that ‘r’)oo-SKETT-tuh.” Now, kiss all your fingertips (and thumbtip, is that considered a finger in an example such as this? I think it is, but, whatever, all five of them) at the same time, then pull your hand away and flare your fingers out into a jazz hand. This is a terrible, stereotypical gesture I have learned from movies and television and I use it here without shame.

So, here is the DaisyPatch version of the Dolce Vita bruschetta.

1 loaf Italian bread (I bought a fresh loaf that was soft. You can buy the crusty kind (is that French? Well THAT won’t work. This is an Italian recipe) but I avoid the crusty kind because it shreds the roof of my mouth. Like Captain Crunch. Ouch. That stuff was painful. How did that get on the market in the first place, I ask you? That cereal inflicted injury. Did I digress?) Slice and then toast in the broiler until just lightly browned (too brown and we’ll get that shredded roof of the mouth thing again.)

1 clove garlic, minced

3-4 tomatoes, chopped

1/2 cup fresh basil – chopped

1 tbsp fresh thyme – removed from the stem

1 shallot (or a teensy red onion), chopped

1/2 cup balsamic vinegar

2 tbsp olive oil

coarse salt

fresh ground pepper

*Note- I don’t measure. I completely eyeballed it, but I think that looks about right.

Mix the garlic, tomatoes, shallot, basil, thyme in a bowl. Add olive oil. Let sit.

Reduce the balsamic vinegar in a pan over the stove until it starts to look thick. Cool. It will get a bit thicker as it cools. You want it thick like honey.

When you are ready to serve, put the veggie mixings on the toasted bread, salt and pepper to taste.  Drizzle with a little balsamic. Serve it up.

And say it with me. Bruschetta. (Don’t forget the hand gesture – kiss, pull, jazz). Molto bene.

(Author note: I am exceptionally proud of these. All veggies and herbs were ours. And they were delicioso.)


I just added RSS (Really Simple Syndication) in the right hand column of my site so you can stay up to date on new posts and comments via RSS, or by email (or just by visiting the site daily because you love it so much!) Your choice. I’m unsure what took me so long. Oh, I know, I was in the garden. It was Really Simple (awful, awful attempt at a play on words. I’m ashamed of it, actually). (Yet, still did it, what does that say?) Have a great weekend.

Stay tuned, we’ll be harvesting potatoes this weekend and Mr. Potatohead is coming back for a guest appearance.

Next Page »